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Say Hello / Deud Helo

This week’s social media weekly news roundup brings you news from around the digital highways and byways. Highlights include Facebook’s new COVID-orientated reaction and TikTok’s new parental controls. Oh, and an update on whether 5G has caused the coronavirus outbreak (major spoiler alert!).

  1. TikTok launches new parental controls
  2. Twitter produces best practise guidelines for videos
  3. Facebook launches a new reaction
  4. 5G does not cause coronavirus
  5. Shutterstock releases free images during coronavirus

newsTikTok launches new parental controls

One of the major concerns about the TikTok app is the amount of vulnerable users it has. It seems to be continually working on ways to protect them, including banning under-16s from private messages to prevent grooming. And now this, an innovation called Family Pairing.

“Today, we are advancing our commitment to building for the safety of our users by introducing Family Pairing, which allows parents and teens to customize their safety settings based on individual needs [it’s] part of our continued work toward providing parents better ability to guide their teen’s online experience.

Parents will now be able to restrict time on the app, set rules on content accessibility, and turn off direct messaging completely. Whether this will put parents’ fears to rest about the app is anyone’s guess. Will such limitations have an impact on its popularity? Only time will tell.

Twitter produces a best practice guide for videos on the platform

So we know by now that videos is by far the best performing feature of online marketing strategies. Tweets with videos apparently see 10x more engagement than a tweet without. Isn’t that fascinating? (If you’re considering setting up a Twitter account for your business, I wrote this handy how-to guide a while back, that sets you up from scratch). The takeaway from this guide are:

👉 Keep it short and simple. Grab attention in the first 3 seconds and don’t hang about too long afterwards.

👉 Keep the product/service in focus.

👉 Visual cues are important – keep your brand logo in frame.

👉 Don’t rely on sound – a lot of people access content without ever turning the volume on.

Sticking to these should see a marked improvement in your metrics. Let us know if you implement them, and how they worked for you!

Facebook launches a new reactionnews

If you can’t show you care in either words or deed, what’s the next best thing? It is, of course, an emoji. Facebook have launched a new reaction for the pandemic age so that you can show your extra support to family or friends during lockdown.

We’ve not seen it in our neck of the woods yet, but we’d be interested to see if you have, and from what part of the world you hail!

Interestingly, Facebook believes a reaction on a post carries more weight than a simple like: so if your follower base for your business leave reactions more often than a simple like, it means the content is having more of an impact.

Let’s see if this little guy sticks around!

5G doesn’t cause coronavirus. Really. No, really.

NHS England’s Director has categorically stated that conspiracy theories surrounding the spread of coronavirus are “the worst kind of fake news”. And that the spread of the virus through 5G masts is “biologically impossible”. Theories surrounding the link between 5G and COVID-19 seemed to start on Facebook in January and have been so persistent, 5G masts have been set alight in places like Birmingham and on Merseyside.

The present epidemic is caused by a virus that is passed from one infected person to another. We know this is true. We even have the virus growing in our lab, obtained from a person with the illness. Viruses and electromagnetic waves that make mobile phones and internet connections work are different things. As different as chalk and cheese. [BBC News]

So put down that flaming torch and pitchfork, and head back to the village.

news

Shutterstock are providing free images for COVID-19 support

Social Media Today reports that Shutterstock, the online platform for stock photography, has launched a COVID resource hub. This hub includes virus-related content and tools, “including a selection of free visuals for use by SMBs”. They’ve also included backgrounds for virtual meetings.

And whilst the content is limited, the quality is high quality. Top work, Shutterstock!

Thanks for taking the time to read the news with me today. I’ll see you next week!